Quote of the Day – 16

One day at a time,
and the day is His day;
He hath numbered its hours,
though they haste or delay.
His grace is sufficient;
we walk not alone;
As the day, so the strength
that He giveth His own.

~~ Annie Johnson Flint, 1866 – 1932

Glyphosate and Gluten Intolerance

Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance

ABSTRACT

Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, skin rashes, macrocytic anemia and depression. It is a multifactorial disease associated with numerous nutritional deficiencies as well as reproductive issues and increased risk to thyroid disease, kidney failure and cancer. Here, we propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. Fish exposed to glyphosate develop digestive problems that are reminiscent of celiac disease. Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria. Characteristics of celiac disease point to impairment in many cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are involved with detoxifying environmental toxins, activating vitamin D3, catabolizing vitamin A, and maintaining bile acid production and sulfate supplies to the gut. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes. Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate’s strong ability to chelate these elements. Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate’s known depletion of these amino acids. Celiac disease patients have an increased risk to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure. Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate. Glyphosate residues in wheat and other crops are likely increasing recently due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to the harvest. We argue that the practice of “ripening” sugar cane with glyphosate may explain the recent surge in kidney failure among agricultural workers in Central America. We conclude with a plea to governments to reconsider policies regarding the safety of glyphosate residues in foods.

Source: Samsel, Anthony, and Stephanie Seneff. “Glyphosate, Pathways to Modern Diseases II: Celiac Sprue and Gluten Intolerance.” Interdisciplinary Toxicology 6.4 (2013): 159–184. PMC. Web. 17 Aug. 2018.

Breakfast With a Dose of Roundup?

Report by the numbers
Conventional Organic
Samples Tested 45 16
Glyphosate Detects 43 5
Detects Above EWG’s Health Benchmark (160 ppb) 31 0

Popular oat cereals, oatmeal, granola and snack bars come with a hefty dose of the weed-killing poison in Roundup, according to independent laboratory tests commissioned by EWG.

Source: Breakfast with a dose of Roundup?

See Also:

WHY FARMERS ARE USING GLYPHOSATE TO KILL THEIR CROPS — AND WHAT IT MIGHT MEAN FOR YOU

Are You Eating Glysophate?

How Does EWG Set a Health Benchmark for Gysophate?

In Season: Zucchini!

Zucchini is good source of phosphorus, copper, magnesium, potassium, manganese, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, and the B vitamins.

Here is our favorite recipe for healthy, gluten-free zucchini-cranberry muffins!

1. Preheat the oven to 350 F.
2. Rub a butter wrapper on muffin cups or otherwise grease the pans so the muffins won’t stick to them.

3. Over a large bowl, sift together dry ingredients and gently stir to combine.

200 grams cloud 9 flour
200 grams chickpea flour

5 ml salt
5 ml baking soda
5 ml baking powder
4 x 5 ml cinnamon

4. In a second large bowl, mix together wet ingredients:

3 eggs
125 ml pear sauce
125 ml olive oil
2 cups granulated sugar
4 x 5 ml vanilla extract

5. Grate 500 g of zucchini and stir into wet ingredients.

6. Add 120 g of dried cranberries into wet ingredients and stir to combine.

7. Pour dry ingredients into wet ingredients, and mix well.

8. Pour into muffin cups. Bake 45 minutes on the top rack, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the muffins comes out cleanly.

9. Remove muffins from the pans and place on wire racks to cool.

10. Wash the dishes while muffins are baking to save time! The total time required is about 1 hour.

In Season: Cabbage!

Cabbage is good source of iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, vitamin C, vitamin K, and the B vitamins.

Cabbage is in season in from mid-June to mid-September. This year, we have grown our own and currently have 12 beautiful, large heads of green cabbage ready to harvest.

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Purchase or gather together other needed supplies, and set them up in the kitchen.

Supplies and Ingredients:

Ziplock large freezer bags, or reusable containers for refrigerator storage

Food-Saver vacuum sealer
Food-Saver plastic, 2 rolls of 11×16, $21.97
sharp scissors, to cut the Food-Saver plastic

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Ok, so here are my steps for preparing and preserving cabbage for the fridge and the freezer. It’s easy!

The first main task is to use a good knife and trim off the woody stem at the bottom of the cabbage. Secondly, cut the cabbage into quarters. Then chop each quarter, measure into bags, and vacuum seal each bag. Place in the fridge or freezer, according to your preference. Finally, wash the dishes! All of this may take 1 to 3 hours, depending on how much cabbage you have.

In Season: Asparagus!

Asparagus is good source of iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, and the B vitamins.

Asparagus is in season in from mid-May to mid-June, for around $3.50 per pound. Our local source is Duggan Farms:

2651 Camp Road
Lake Country, BC V4V
Tel (250) 766-2628

* Please call ahead.

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Place your order for asparagus about 3 days before you want to pick it up. Purchase or gather together other needed supplies, and set them up in the kitchen.

Supplies and Ingredients:

Ziplock large freezer bags, or reusable containers for refrigerator storage

Food-Saver vacuum sealer
Food-Saver plastic, 2 rolls of 11×16, $21.97
sharp scissors, to cut the Food-Saver plastic

water bath canner
kettle, for boiling water as needed
large pot
small pot
canning funnel
canning tongs
24 jars and rings
Bernardin canning lids, 2 packages of 12, $9.98

25 lbs of asparagus
cutting board
sharp knife
large bowl
colander
dish towels and cloths
kitchen scale
measuring cups and spoons

4 L of 5% natural vinegar, $2.98
pickling salt, $2.49
granulated white cane sugar, $3.32
dill seed
dried dill
cayenne pepper
mustard seed
celery seed, $4.99
garlic, $2.31

– – – – –

Ok, so here are my steps for preparing and preserving asparagus, for the fridge, the freezer, and two kinds of pickles.

The first main task is to trim off the woody ends, sort into sizes, measure the weight, and wash the asparagus. It may take about 3 hours.

1. Using a good knife, gently cut the end of each asparagus stem on top of a cutting board. If the stem is soft, cut it all the way. If it is hard, move the knife up the stem little by little until the asparagus is soft. Put the woody ends into a large bowl. Working through all the asparagus stems, make four separate piles: long and thick, long and thin, short and thick, and short and thin.

2. Measure the weight of each pile. This year, my categories are as follows:

Total:

25 lbs of asparagus, x $3.50 lb = $87.50

25 lbs of asparagus x 453.59 g = about 11000 g or 11 kg

$87.50/11 kg = $7.95 per kg of asparagus.

Trimmed and sorted:

Long and thick: 3 kg = 3 ziplock bags of 1 kg each, to put in the fridge for fresh eating. 3 kg x $7.95 = $23.85

Long and thin: 2 kg = 2 bags of 1 kg each, to vacuum-seal and freeze. 2 kg x $7.95 = $15.90

Long and thin: 2 kg, set aside for pickles.

Short and thick: 1 kg, set aside for pickles.

Short and thin: 1 kg, set aside for pickles.

4 kg x $7.95 = $31.80

Bernardin canning lids, 2 packages of 12, $9.98

4 L of 5% natural vinegar, $2.98

garlic, $2.31

Cost of pickles: $47.07/ 24 jars = $1.96 per jar

Woody ends: 2 kg, to vacuum-seal and freeze, to include in vegetable broth next fall. 2 kg x $7.95 = $15.90

3. Fill a sink half full of cold water. Gently swish each pile of asparagus seperately, place in a colander or bowl to remove excess water, and then onto a dish towel. Bag and seal asparagus for the fridge and freezer. Each step here may take 2 to 5 minutes. (Ziplock bags or containers work great to keep asparagus fresh in the fridge. For the freezer, I always use a vacuum-sealer now. I have had vegetables keep 2 to 4 years even!)

4. Set out ingredients for asparagus pickles: 12 garlic cloves, dill seed, cayenne pepper, 4 L of 5% vinegar, a kettle of hot water, canning salt, celery seed, mustard seed, dried dill, and white cane sugar.

5. Fill a clean dishwasher (or sink, to wash by hand) with 24 pint jars and rings, a small amount of dishwasher detergent, and wash on the hottest setting. Fill a water bath canner with water.

6. Break for lunch.

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The second main task is to make the pickles. It may take another 3 hours from start to finish, including clean up.

7. Batch #1: Asparagus Pickles with Garlic and Dill.

Bring canner to a boil. Peel 12 garlic cloves. Place one in the bottom of each of 12 pints. Add 1 ml of dill seed to each jar, and a few shakes of cayennne pepper to 6 jars.

8. Trim the asparagus so that it will fit 3 cm down from the rim of the jar. Stems that have no tops, cut into short pieces.

Short and thick: 1 kg 200 g

Short and thin: 1 kg

This will make 6 pints of asparagus spears and 6 pints of pieces.

9. In a large pot, combine 4x 250 ml each of hot water and 5% white vinegar. Add 120 ml canning salt. Stir, and bring to a boil. Add 12 canning lids to a small pot of water, and bring to a boil.

10. Using a canning funnel and a measuring cup or ladle, fill each jar with brine, leaving 1 cm of headspace. Using a butter knife, remove air bubbles and add more brine if necessary. Wipe rims of jars with a clean, hot, damp cloth. Apply canning lids and loosely tighten rings.

11. Using canning tongs, place jars in a boiling water canner, and boil for 10 minutes. Set on a towel or rack to cool. Repeat with the next 6 pints. The jars should seal within 20 minutes of being out of the canner, but may take longer. Check the seals by pressing on the lids. If the lid moves or makes a sound, it hasn’t sealed and can be boiled again with a following batch, or refrigerated in a few hours if it hasn’t sealed by then.

12. Allow jars to sit for 7 days for best flavour development. Yield: 12 pints.

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13. Batch #2: Sweet Asparagus Pickles.

Bring canner to a boil. Set out 12 pints. To each jar, add: 1 ml of celery seed, 2 or 4 ml of mustard seed, and 10 ml of dried dill.

14. Trim the asparagus so that it will fit 3 cm down from the rim of the jar. Stems that have no tops, cut into short pieces.

Tall and thin: 2 kg

This will make 6 pints of asparagus spears and 6 pints of pieces.

15. In the same large pot, with any remaining brine, add 6x 250 ml of hot water and 8x 250 ml 5% white vinegar. Add 400 g white cane sugar and 80 ml canning salt. Stir, and bring to a boil. Add 12 canning lids to a small pot of water, and bring to a boil.

16. Using a canning funnel and a measuring cup or ladle, fill each jar with brine, leaving 1 cm of headspace. Using a butter knife, remove air bubbles and add more brine if necessary. Wipe rims of jars with a clean, hot, damp cloth. Apply canning lids and loosely tighten rings.

17. Using canning tongs, place jars in a boiling water canner, and boil for 10 minutes. Set on a towel or rack to cool. Repeat with the next 6 pints. The jars should seal within 20 minutes of being out of the canner, but may take longer. Check the seals by pressing on the lids. If the lid moves or makes a sound, it hasn’t sealed and can be boiled again with a following batch, or refrigerated in a few hours if it hasn’t sealed by then.

18. Allow jars to sit for 7 days for best flavour development. Yield: 12 pints.

– – – –

19. Load the dishwasher, wash counters and tables, and sweep the floor.

20. Let the canner cool, and wash it the next day. Also the next day, tighten the rings on the jars, wash jars gently if they are sticky, and store in a cool, dark place.

Merry Christmas!

Now there were in the same country shepherds living out in the fields, keeping watch over their flock by night. And behold, an angel of the Lord stood before them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were greatly afraid.

Then the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid, for behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy which will be to all people. For there is born to you this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. And this will be the sign to you: You will find a Babe wrapped in swaddling cloths, lying in a manger.”

And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying:

“Glory to God in the highest,
And on earth peace, goodwill toward men!”

~~ Luke 2:8-14, New King James Version